On Quantum mecahnics and Entanhled time

getpocket.com/explore/item/you-thought-quantum-mechanics-was-weird-check-out-entangled-time

Most contemporary philosophical accounts of the relationship between objects and their properties embrace entanglement solely from the perspective of spatial nonlocality. But there’s still significant work to be done on incorporating temporal nonlocality – not only in object-property discussions, but also in debates over material composition (such as the relation between a lump of clay and the statue it forms), and part-whole relations (such as how a hand relates to a limb, or a limb to a person). For example, the ‘puzzle’ of how parts fit with an overall whole presumes clear-cut spatial boundaries among underlying components, yet spatial nonlocality cautions against this view. Temporal nonlocality further complicates this picture: how does one describe an entity whose constituent parts are not even coexistent?

Historical Shifts in the Ideology of Work

Historical Shifts in the Ideology of Work

Historical Shifts in the Ideology of Work
— Read on theforgenews.org/2019/06/14/historical-shifts-in-the-ideology-of-work/

Ownership of craft tools was central to artisan identity and following 1776, it was common for urban white craftsmen to brandish their craft tools as a symbol of their elevated socioeconomic status and to display patriotism.

Anthropologist digitizes a changing culture from half a world away

phys.org/news/2020-01-anthropologist-digitizes-culture-world.html

In 2006, University of Virginia anthropologist Lise Dobrin received a document attached to an email from a man she knew in Papua New Guinea, where she had conducted fieldwork for her dissertation several years earlier. The document told the story of the history of the man’s village. He wrote that he was afraid if he didn’t write it, no one else would.

[Repost] Bonifacio is the first Philippine President

Read entire article: manilatoday.net/revolutionary-president-andres-bonifacio/

And with Bonifacio at the helm of the Philippines, would the country have been very different?

“I believe so. With Bonifacio in power, the Pact of Biak na Bato wouldn’t have happened. He would never have been fooled by the Americans. He would have led the Filipino people to continue the Revolution and we would have been a sovereign Philippines. Aguinaldo and his men should have cooperated with Bonifacio and the Katipunan, but Aguinaldo et al were full of pride with their elite educated leaders. Bonifacio had a one track mind when it came to the country’s freedom, just like Apolinario Mabini and Antonio Luna – definitely no compromise with the Americans.”

In the end, while there may be small hope that the current administration will act on the calls of this campaign for the Supremo, Chua is confident that as time goes on, more and more Filipinos will come to know the continuing relevance of Bonifacio and what he and the Katipunan fought and lived for.

“To recognize Andres Bonifacio’s presidency is to recognize a form of government that is not just a copy of the Western Style democracy but a concept that came from us—to uphold puri (honor) at kabanalan (spirituality) to have real kaginhawaan that leads to true kalayaan. A much needed attitude that each of us, especially our leaders must take into heart, before we can truly walk on the road to genuine freedom and progress. And more importantly, to recognize Andres Bonifacio’s presidency is to give justice to the man who built the Filipino nation,” he said.